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DDO wiki:Wikiquette

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Principles of wikiquette

The below principles come from Wikipedia's Wikiquette page.

  • Assume good faith. Comply with etiquette ethics. This wiki has worked remarkably well so far based on a policy of nearly complete freedom to edit. People come here to collaborate and write helpful game information.
  • Remember The Golden Rule: Treat others as you would have them treat you—even if they are new. We were all newbies once.
  • Be polite: "A soft answer turneth away wrath".
  • Unless you have an excellent reason not to do so, sign and date your posts to talk pages (not articles).
  • Work towards agreement.
  • Argue facts, not personalities.
  • Do not make misrepresentations.
  • Do not ignore questions.
  • If another disagrees with your edit, provide good reasons why you think that it is appropriate.
  • Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste.
  • Although it is understandably difficult in an intense argument, if other editors are not as civil as you would like them to be, be more civil than they are, not less. That way at least you are not moving towards open conflict and name-calling; by your own action you are actively doing something about it: take a hit and refrain from hitting back—everybody appreciates that (or at least they should).
  • Give praise when due. Everybody likes to feel appreciated, especially in an environment that often requires compromise. Drop a friendly note on users' talk pages.
  • Help mediate disagreements between others.
  • If you are arguing, take a break. If you are mediating, recommend a break.
  • Remove or summarize resolved disputes that you initiated.
  • Remind yourself that these are people with whom you are dealing. They have feelings, and probably have other people in the world who love them. Try to treat others with dignity. The world is a big place, with different cultures and conventions. Do not use jargon that others might not understand. Use acronyms carefully and clarify if there is the possibility of any doubt.
  • When reverting other people's edits, give a rationale for the revert (on the article's talk page, if necessary), and be prepared to enter into an extended discussion over the edits in question. Calmly explaining your thinking to others can often result in their agreeing with you; being dogmatic or uncommunicative evokes the same behavior in others, and gets you embroiled in an edit war.
  • It is also inappropriate to make changes to a page solely to change the case of the section headings.